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26 Week Old Baby Development New 2020

26 Week Old Baby Development

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Your Growing Baby

His Growing Motor Skills

Between 6 and 12 months, your baby gets physical, focusing on the gross motor skills he needs for crawling, cruising, walking, and tossing a ball. You can get him going by placing him belly-down on the floor (more tummy time!) and putting his favorite toys just out of reach. With you cheering him on, and with his stuffed bear tantalizingly close by, he might be motivated enough to take a few creeps forward. When you’re playing together, switch his position often so he uses different muscle groups. For instance, stand him on your lap and let him bounce, place him in a sitting position, or lift him in the air and fly him around like Superman. An exer-saucer or jumper can strengthen your baby’s legs by giving him the chance to put more weight on them, but keeping him confined too often can delay crawling. Give him plenty of opportunities to hang out on the floor so he can move when he’s ready.

Your baby also continues to hone his fine motor skills these days, developing the dexterity to feed himself with a spoon or pick up tiny objects. While your baby’s grasp is improving, he’s better at holding larger objects that he can palm, such as sippy cups. To boost these skills, give your baby activity boards, blocks, balls, stuffed animals, and books — anything he can use his fingers to twist, squeeze, turn, open, close, poke, or bang.

Source: Parent
Keyword: 26 Week Old Baby Development

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35 Week Old Baby Development New 2020

35 Week Old Baby Development

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Must-Knows

Baby Etiquette & Manners

Babies are adorable, sweet, affectionate, charming — but they’re not exactly etiquette experts. And every so often, your baby’s behavior might leave you scrambling to hide your red cheeks. Case in point: If your baby has stranger anxiety, she might shriek in fear at the sight of family members she doesn’t see all the time — such as Grandma from Florida or Auntie Megan who goes to college 2,000 miles away. That can lead to humiliation and hurt feelings on their end — and a lot of helpless anxiety and embarrassment on yours.

Naturally, your baby isn’t trying to hurt anyone’s feelings, and she definitely didn’t aim to mortify you. She’s just being a baby, behaving in instinctual ways that might not make her the belle of the ball. Our advice: Play it cool. It’s OK to calmly apologize for her behavior (“Sorry, I guess Jane doesn’t want to be held right now”) and explain that your baby takes a while to warm up to people she doesn’t see every single day. Adding a note about the developmental normalcy of separation anxiety can’t hurt either. The more relaxed you are about the episode, the sooner your baby will warm up to her relatives, and the sooner your mother-in-law will laugh it off.

One thing you learn from having a baby is to expect the unexpected. Meeting even the most bizarre behavior with good grace marks you as an expert mom.

Source: Parent
Keyword: 35 Week Old Baby Development

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18 Month Old Child Development New 2020

18 Month Old Child Development

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Must-Knows

Moms Need to Sleep Too!

Is a good night of sleep eluding you? Sleep deprivation isn’t just for parents of newborns; many women find themselves caught in a cycle of restless nights and hazy days. Inadequate sleep not only makes us tired (and sometimes cranky!) but can lead to impatience, poor decision-making, even depression and illness. What’s an exhausted mom to do?

Start by taking a look at your nighttime habits. When your toddler is rubbing her eyes, you give her a warm bath, dress her in comfy pajamas, and read her a story before tucking her in with a good-night kiss. Moms know that consistent bedtime routines are super helpful in getting kids to sleep. Now consider that using external cues can also help you get more, better quality Zs.

Determine what bedtime works best for you and give yourself a chance to unwind. Watching TV, surfing the Web, drinking coffee or alcohol, or getting in a late workout all prohibit restful sleep. Instead, try sipping a cup of caffeine-free herbal tea, reading a book, listening to music, praying, or meditating. If you find your mind whirling with thoughts, jot them down in a journal so you won’t worry about forgetting something important.

Check your surroundings: Is your bedroom clean and inviting? Is the temperature cool enough? Is your bed comfortable? Think about what calms you and add these elements to your sleeping area.

Lastly, make the most of your time. When your baby was born, you likely heard the old adage “sleep while the baby sleeps,” and that still holds true today if you’re wiped out from inadequate rest. Go ahead and indulge in a daytime nap while your little one is in her crib. If you’re not well, get a friend to watch your child while you catch a much-needed snooze.

Source: Parent
Keyword: 18 Month Old Child Development

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Post-Baby Ab Rehab Workout New 2020

Post-Baby Ab Rehab Workout

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Post-Baby Ab Rehab Workout

Almost every mom dreams about getting her abs back in shape after giving birth (unless you’re one of the lucky few who shrank back to your old self the minute you left the delivery room). The logical solution is to do tons of crunches, right? Actually, that’s one of the worst moves you can make, says Michele Olson, PhD, professor of exercise science at Auburn University, in Montgomery, Alabama. “Crunches only target one of several ab muscles — primarily the rectus abdominis — and that’s the one that’s most overstretched during pregnancy,” she explains. Not only will going crunch-crazy get you iffy results, you’ll put too much pressure on this now-delicate, overburdened muscle.

And even if your child is older and your abs have long since healed, all moms will get the best results possible by doing a mix of tummy-toning moves that target all your ab muscles. Her crunch-free Pilates plan does just that — and, as a bonus, it strengthens your pelvic-floor muscles, which also get weaker during pregnancy. Do this super-quick workout three times a week and you’ll see firmer abs in no time!

Single-Leg Circles

Lie faceup on the floor with your arms at your sides, palms down. Scoop your belly in (imagine you’re pulling your belly button toward your spine) and extend your right leg toward the ceiling, toes pointed and turned slightly outward. Inhale and imagine that you’re tracing a circle about the size of a dinner plate with your right leg, tightening your abs to keep hips still on the floor throughout the movement. Circle 10 times clockwise, then repeat in a counter-clockwise direction. Switch legs and repeat.

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Post-Baby Ab Rehab Workout

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Introducing Baby to Solid Foods With Allergy Awareness New 2020

Introducing Baby to Solid Foods With Allergy Awareness

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Introducing Baby to Solid Foods With Allergy Awareness

Does the order in which I introduce solids affect the likelihood of an allergy surfacing?

Jill Castle, MS, RD, LDN advises starting with nutrient-dense foods that are a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, and iron, including cooked pureed meat and fish. You can also offer some of the least-allergenic foods at first, such as oatmeal, root vegetables, avocados, bananas, and sweet potatoes, to ensure that your baby is getting a wide variety of nutrients, textures, and flavors. Soon after, offer the top allergens including egg and peanut. Research suggests that early, regular exposure to these foods may reduce the risk of developing allergies to them. Be sure that the food is presented in developmentally appropriate forms: pureed, blended in with other foods, or as a safe finger food. Don’t serve whole nuts or gobs of nut butter, for example, which are a choking hazard for babies. “Be observant, responsive, and connected,” advises Castle, “and you will be able to gauge readiness for the next step.”

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Introducing Baby to Solid Foods With Allergy Awareness

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20 Month Old Child Development New 2020

20 Month Old Child Development

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Healthy & Safety Info

Signs of Asthma

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs and the bronchial tubes — airways that carry oxygen into and out of the lungs. Little kids who suffer with asthma have inflamed airways that become swollen, irritated, and sensitive. Certain conditions or substances such as air pollutants, smoke, allergens, cold air, and viruses will cause recurring asthma attacks in which the airways swell and produce thick mucus. The sufferer might also experience chest tightness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, and coughing.

Though asthma affects people of all ages, this lung condition commonly starts in children. If your toddler wheezes, coughs often, and has eczema or allergies, discuss these symptoms with her pediatrician. If the doctor determines your youngster is suffering from asthma, he’ll teach you how to prevent asthma attacks and what to do if an attack occurs. To avoid a severe asthma attack, it’s necessary to treat the symptoms when they first begin, often with asthma medication. Unfortunately there is no cure for asthma, but your child’s pediatrician can help you formulate a plan for monitoring and treating the asthma.

While coughing is a symptom of asthma, sometimes a cough is just part of a cold. It’s true that there’s still no cure for a common cold, but there are plenty of natural remedies you can use to help your toddler weather the sniffles and sneezes. Begin with ensuring your child is getting plenty of rest. Fluids (yep, like chicken soup!) help by thinning mucus, easing sore throat pain, and hydrating a body with a fever. A cool mist humidifier and saline drops ease congestion, as does propping up the end of your toddler’s bed. And of course time spent with you reading a book, listening to quiet music, or just cuddling is always good for what ails your little one.

Source: Parent
Keyword: 20 Month Old Child Development

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Baby Products We Can’t Live Without New 2020

Baby Products We Can't Live Without

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Baby Products We Can’t Live Without

Why We Love It: Hunching over to feed baby can do a number on your back, so nursing pillows, which prop baby up, are a godsend (plus, they get baby in proper feeding position). Our rec? The ubiquitous Boppy Feeding & Infant Support Pillow. This cushy horseshoe-shaped pillow provides ergonomically correct support, and a new “Miracle Middle” stretch panel fits comfortably around even Daddy’s waist. Bonus: As baby grows, the pillow becomes a handy baby prop for tummy time. We love accessorizing with the super-soft Pottery Barn Kids chamois personalized Boppy covers that you can just throw in the wash.

What Real Moms Say: “When you spend a full third of your life breastfeeding in those first few months (my daughter would feed for almost an hour, every three hours!), you just need to be comfortable and the Boppy makes it so easy,” Sue from Union, New Jersey, said.

Where to Buy: The Boppy pillow costs $24.99 (slipcovers are sold separately). The Pottery Barn Kids slipcovers cost $25 each.

Source: Parent
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Baby Products We Can’t Live Without

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30 Week Old Baby Development New 2020

30 Week Old Baby Development

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Your Growing Baby

Milestones & More!

Around 30 weeks, you’ll notice that your baby has the memory and cognitive ability to figure out what’s going to happen next. If he hears the keys jingling in the lock at 6 p.m., he kicks his legs in anticipation of your arrival home from work. When he hears you pop the lid off a baby food jar, he claps and squeals because he knows it’s lunchtime. Your baby relies on sensory input — sounds, smells, sights — to figure out what’s going on, in part because he’s such a keen observer of his surroundings, and in part because he loves repetition and routine so much that he’s quick to pick up on it. Be prepared, though, for a minor meltdown if he gets it wrong. When it wasn’t a baby food jar he heard but simply you washing the dishes, he might wail for his missed meal.

Your baby’s fine motor skills continue to grow more sophisticated. He’s comfortable banging, shaking, dropping, and throwing his toys. You might notice that your baby’s getting better at feeding himself by picking up food using his thumb and fingers (instead of just holding stuff in his whole palm). His grip will become even more precise as he nears 12 months, when babies often master the pincer grasp — between thumb and pointer finger — to pick up teeny-tiny things such as Cheerios.

As those hand skills develop, you might wonder whether your baby will be right-handed or left-handed. Although some babies start to show a preference for one side as early as 3 months of age, most use both hands equally throughout the first year — so don’t be surprised if your guy sucks his left thumb one day, then uses his right hand to roll a ball the next. (Statistically, more than 70 percent of people are right-handed, so chances are fairly good your baby will be too.)

Source: Parent
Keyword: 30 Week Old Baby Development

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Baby Allergies: Prevention & Treatment Tips New 2020

Baby Allergies: Prevention & Treatment Tips

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Baby Allergy Facts

Baby Care Basics: Allergies

baby allergies Shannon Greer

Although you may not dare leave the house these days without checking the pollen count and stuffing your pockets with Kleenex, luckily you need not worry — yet — that your baby will also experience hay fever. “Allergies develop after a cumulative exposure to an allergen,” explains Anne Miranowski, M.D., a pediatric allergist in Fairfax, Virginia. “An infant doesn’t spend enough time outdoors to develop a reaction to tree pollen, grass, or ragweed.” However, allergic reactions to food and indoor environmental irritants can occur during baby’s first year and might trigger symptoms like red eyes, sneezing, sniffling, or eczema.

If you or your partner has an allergy, your baby is at increased risk. Her allergy may be completely different, though; if you’re allergic to pollen, your child might react to cats. But even if you and your spouse never itch or sneeze, your kid isn’t necessarily in the clear. Childhood allergies are on the rise, and many young sufferers have no family history. Some experts think our superclean, ultra-hygienic lifestyle plays a role. If kids live in an almost-germ-free bubble, the theory goes, their immune system will pick fights with other invaders, like foods or household particles. Of course, we’re not suggesting you abandon hand sanitizer — which is why we asked experts for practical advice on how to manage the types of allergies that affect infants most.

Childhood Eczema

Where did your baby’s glowing, flawless complexion go? If you see a red, dry patch on his forehead, cheeks, forearms, legs, scalp, or neck, it’s probably eczema. This skin reaction is sometimes the first sign of an allergy. Because eczema is itchy, your little guy might wake up during the night to scratch and then be extra tired during the day. But don’t be alarmed. Eczema is very common — 1 in 5 kids has it — and it gets less severe with age.

How to Prevent It: You might love nuzzling your sweetly scented baby, but perfumed products for bath, skin, and even laundry can aggravate sensitive skin and cause eczema. So switch to fragrance-free products for a quick fix. (Avoid unscented ones, which can still contain fragrances used to mask another odor.)

How to How to Treat It: Dr. Miranowski says a simple daily bathing regimen clears up many mild cases. “Years ago, people thought that you shouldn’t bathe a baby with eczema too often because it would dry out the skin,” she says. “But that’s not true. Water restores moisture to dry skin.” So she recommends a daily “soap-and-seal” routine. After washing your child with a mild, fragrance-free cleanser (try Dove, Cetaphil, or Eucerin), pat her skin dry and apply moisturizer. Ointments (like Aquaphor) are best, and cream-based formulas (like Cetaphil) also work well. Both are better than lotion, which contains more alcohol and can be drying.

If your baby’s eczema is advanced, a bleach bath — which isn’t as shocking as it sounds — may help. Soaking for five to ten minutes two to three times weekly in a diluted bleach bath is five times more effective at treating eczema in children (ages 9 months and up) than plain water is, shows a 2009 study published in Pediatrics. “Bleach isn’t harmful to the skin,” Dr. Miranowski says. “It’s similar to swimming in a pool, only cleaner. This bath is helpful because it reduces a type of bacteria on the skin that contributes to eczema.” An oatmeal bath can also soothe itchy skin. Unlike bleach, though, it won’t kill the bacteria that cause eczema.

Been there, done that, and no improvement? See a pediatric allergist for a skin or blood test to determine if your little one is reacting to a household particle (dust mites, mold, or pet dander) or a food (baby’s formula or food you’re eating as a nursing mom). Once you pinpoint the cause, eliminate it, which should clear up baby’s skin. An allergist can also prescribe a steroid cream to stop the itch.

Food Allergies

Peanuts are on everyone’s radar, but they aren’t the only troublesome food. Eggs, milk, wheat, soy, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish are also top allergens. About 3 million kids (almost 4 out of every 100) have a food allergy. Some fade as a child ages; others tend to stick for life. As for reactions, your child might have a mild one, like getting a few hives around the mouth. Or he might experience a more severe response, such as swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat, or trouble breathing.

How To Prevent It: You might not be able to stop an allergy, says Jacqueline Eghrari-Sabet, M.D., founder of Family Asthma & Allergy Care in Maryland. The American Academy of Pediatrics used to tell parents to delay the introduction of certain foods like nuts and shellfish if their kids battled eczema or if they had a family history of food allergies. Some docs also used to advise pregnant women to avoid nuts. Now we know there’s no proof that either tactic works, but there is good reason to introduce new foods gradually. Spacing out their intro over several days will help you ID a problem food if your baby does have an issue, says Trong Le, M.D., an allergist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

All that said, breastfeeding might offer some protection. A report in a 2008 issue of Pediatrics found that breastfeeding high-risk babies for at least four months can delay or possibly prevent the onset of food allergies, asthma, and eczema. Hypoallergenic infant formulas can also help. In these, the cow’s milk proteins are broken down into such small particles that most infants who have a milk allergy can tolerate them.

How to How to Treat It: When eczema is persistent or your child has a reaction to food, visit a pediatric allergist for skin or blood tests. If the results are positive, you’ll need to eliminate that food from your child’s diet. This means you’ll be taking your reading glasses to the grocery store so you can closely inspect labels; nuts, eggs, milk, and wheat are ingredients in many foods. Also, add two very important items to your diaper bag: Children’s Benadryl (an over-the-counter antihistamine liquid) and an Epi-Pen Jr. (a prescription adrenaline injector), so you’re prepared if your child accidentally eats a trigger food. You’ll also need to make sure that your child’s day-care provider, grandparents, and babysitters are aware of the allergy and how to manage it.

If the test results are negative, you might want to see a pediatric gastroenterologist. Your baby could have a food intolerance, which means she has trouble digesting a particular food. This can cause acid reflux, gas, bloating, or diarrhea — which are not allergic reactions.

Something to consider: Recent research published in the January 2010 issue of the The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology shows that 80 percent of children diagnosed with a peanut allergy don’t have a true allergy. It’s possible that a positive test result could simply indicate a minor sensitivity and not a full-blown allergy, says study author Adnan Custovic, M.D.

Nasal Allergies

Constantly wiping your baby’s nose for weeks on end isn’t one of the perks of motherhood. A runny nose is only one possible symptom of a nasal allergy. Others include red and itchy eyes, nose rubbing, and clear (rather than yellow or green) mucus. Kids aren’t typically bothered by outdoor triggers like grass and ragweed until after age 3, but they can be bothered by household allergens such as mold, dust mites, pet dander, and cockroaches. Nasal allergies affect as many as 40 percent of children, and symptoms can start as early as 6 months. Pay close attention to when your child’s sneezing or itching peaks: This can clue you in to what’s responsible. For example, dust mites live in bedding and furniture, so if your child is allergic to dust mites, she’ll probably wake up with itchy eyes and a runny nose after inhaling them overnight. Or if your baby can’t tolerate pet dander, you might notice that her symptoms erupt when you’re visiting Grandma and her cats.

How To Prevent It: Get cleaning! Mold flourishes in damp environments, so kill it by wiping under the fridge, scrubbing bathrooms, cleaning or changing shower curtains, and washing and disinfecting garbage cans. Wipe off mini blinds, which trap dust, or replace them with washable drapes. Laundering sheets and stuffed animals in hot water weekly can reduce the level of dust mites and pet dander. Vacuum carpets at least once a week (and upholstery a couple of times every month), especially if you have a dog or cat. Ideally, you should use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter, which actually removes allergens rather than spewing them around the room. For both carpet and upholstery, avoid wet cleaners, as they can leave rugs and furniture damp, creating an environment for mold. Cockroaches are a less common problem, especially in nonurban areas, but play it safe by removing garbage from the kitchen, keeping food in sealed containers, and regularly cleaning counters and floors. Dust mites and cockroaches thrive in humid areas, so fix water leaks and use a dehumidifier as well.

How to Treat It: If your child has a pet allergy, keep Rex and Mr. Whiskers out of your child’s room, and also establish a pet-free zone in the part of your house where your baby spends most of his time, Dr. Miranowski says. In addition to vacuuming regularly, you can bathe your pet every week and install a HEPA filter in an air purifier to remove dander. If these measures don’t work — and if your child continues to have a reaction to dander or dust mites despite your best housekeeping efforts — an allergist will likely prescribe a medication. Claritin and Zyrtec are both available as a syrup, and they’re approved for children older than 2 years. Of course, if your kid has a severe allergy, you can find a new pet-friendly home for Rex, but these other tactics often work well.

Now that you know how to keep your baby’s sniffles at bay (at least most of the time), sit back and relax a little. Until, of course, you have to worry about seasonal allergies in a few years!

Source: Parent
Keyword: Baby Allergies: Prevention & Treatment Tips

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Baby Sunscreen Guide: Sun Protection Safety Tips New 2020

Baby Sunscreen Guide: Sun Protection Safety Tips

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Baby Sunscreen Guide: Sun Protection Safety Tips

Nobody enjoys the painful experience of a sunburn, but prolonged sun exposure is especially harmful to young babies. “Babies have sensitive skin. They also don’t regulate their body temperature well,” says Debra M. Langlois, M.D., an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan. Because of this, sunburnt babies can develop dehydration, heat stroke, and other scary side effects.

Getting sunburnt also increases your risk of skin cancer. According to Adena Rosenblatt, M.D., Ph.D, a pediatric dermatologist at The University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital, a majority of sun damage occurs within the first 18 years of life. “By the time people reach adulthood, most of the damage is already done,” she says.

Thankfully, sunburns and skin cancer have one major kryptonite: sunscreen. Read on for the ultimate baby sunscreen guide, including safety facts and application tips.

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Baby Sunscreen Guide: Sun Protection Safety Tips